The Wheat and the Weeds

Scripture: Matthew 13:24-30, Matthew 13:36-43

Topics: Eternity, Final Loss, Final Victory, Heaven, Hell, Hypocrisy, Judgment, Sorting

Study Guide

In our current culture in which we crave affirmation, the reality of God’s eternal judgment is a hard pill for most of us to swallow. However, if we profess to believe the inerrant word of God, then it is unavoidable that Scripture tells us of the reality of God’s judgment and separation time and time again. In the parable of the wheat and the weeds, Jesus warns us to be sober-minded, knowing that God alone has the power to judge and evaluate us and recognizing that only Jesus’ blood is sufficient to cover our sins.
Application
  1. The irony of our difficulty with God’s judgment is that we are constantly judging whether or not we are being treated fairly. We can’t do anything without judging, cutting, or separating. What are some of the judgmental thoughts you have had just today alone?

  2. We love getting justice for us, but we don't want justice done to us. However, the question we have to ask is, “Do we want a God who evaluates, judges, and rids the world of evil, or do we want a God who lets it all go?” How does this resonate with you? How can that be a comfort in the midst of what we can think of as unjust circumstances?

  3. This whole passage is a warning for us not to evaluate God but to recognize that as the Creator of the universe, he has a right to and will evaluate us. How do you need to respond to this warning from Jesus?

  4. Read 2 Corinthians 13:5. According to Jesus, there are many non-believers in our church, and since not all are believers yet look like they are, we will see some people fall. How does this truth sober you and encourage you to take Paul’s direction seriously?

Key Points
  • The parable explained:

    • Son of Man = Farmer (sows)
    • Field = World
    • Good seed = People in the Kingdom of God
    • Weeds = Those who belong to the evil one
    • Enemy = Devil
    • Harvest = End of world
    • Harvesters = Angels
  • The irony of our difficulty with the word “judgment” in terms of the almighty God is that we, as humans, sit in judgment about everything. We are constantly measuring whether we are being treated with fairness.

  • We love getting justice for ourselves, but we don't want justice done to us. Do we want a God who evaluates, judges, and rids the world of evil, or do we want a God who lets it all go?

  • When we tell God we don't think he should judge, we are making a judgment; we critique God for doing something we are doing ourselves.

  • From what we understand, for those who trust in Jesus, judgment was poured out on Jesus instead of them, and their name is written in the Book of Life. For those who have not, they will have to stand on their own merit and deal with their own sin, as their names are written in the Book of Deeds. In other words, if you have trusted in Jesus, you are judged according to Jesus’ deeds. If you trust in yourself, you are judged according to your own deeds.

  • If you have ears to hear, eyes to see, and a heart to understand, you should incorporate this truth and respond.

  • According to Jesus, there are many non-believers in our church. Since not all are believers yet look like they are, we will see some people fall. We should be sobered by these words and examine ourselves regularly according to 2 Corinthians 13:5.

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